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WALTZING GAILY OUT OF THE HOUSE IN YOUR UNDERWEAR…

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At the end of an editing day… zzz

Do you find the process of editing your story easy? No? It exhausts you? You’re tired of reading the same thing over and over until your brain feels like mush?  Excellent… You’re obviously doing it right. It is hard work, but a writer friend got it in one when she said to me, that every edit would bring me nearer to what it was I wanted to say in the first place.

“I’m all for the scissors. I believe more in the scissors than I do in the pencil.” Truman Capote.

I realise that I was never a true writer until I had waded through the incredibly difficult and amazingly rewarding job of editing my novel. Now, I am a writer. There is nothing like that special moment towards the end of what feels like the 200th edit,  when you begin to really believe in your story and therefore to believe in yourself as a writer.

I’ve been particularly blessed to find myself a truly hard working editor by the name of Emer Cleary from Emu Ink Publishing. She has been incredibly thorough in her handling of my manuscript. We don’t always agree on everything but Emer is one of those rare breeds of editor who thinks how can I help the writer to write better in their own style and not how  would I write it if it were mine.

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The art of deleting over a cuppa…

My first draft of my novel was 150,000 words! Gulp! It is now 95,000 words… a fitting length for this novel.

“So the writer who breeds more words than he needs, is making a chore for the reader who reads.” Dr. Seuss

On this journey I’ve learned that good writing is not all about writerly flourish, sizzling similes and magnificent metaphors. Keeping the language simple adds to the narrative.

“I never write ‘metropolis’ for seven cents when I can write ‘city’ and get paid the same.” Mark Twain

“The best style is the style you don’t notice.” Somerset Maugham

“If it sounds like writing, I rewrite it. Elmore Leonard

In the interest of research I had myself locked in a cell in a Garda station to get an authentic feel for how my character would react to such a situation and went away and wrote an amazingly brilliant piece of writing on the subject.

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You can imagine my dismay when my editor came back and said that this chapter slowed down the pace of the novel and added nothing to the plot! I sat down and did what I tell everyone else to do, but hadn’t done myself, because I knew this chapter was fabulous! I re-read it out loud to myself. Always the best way to edit. You can feel the cringe rising as you speak… I now have a fast moving chapter where every word is important to the story.

 

“Kill your darlings, kill your darlings. Even if it breaks your heart, kill your darlings. Stephen King

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And punctuation… I’ve come to realise that it is sometimes a matter of style but the knack is in being consistent throughout. ‘Let’s eat Grandma could be fatal though if you meant to say Let’s eat, Grandma.

Oh and clichés… reading them makes me shudder but it doesn’t stop me writing them…

“Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.”  Anton Chekhov

So to all my editors on this writing journey, I say a huge thank you. Firstly to Kieran O’ Kelly who died this year and who I miss terribly. Kieran was the first editor of Summer Triangle and this book will be dedicated to him. Then there were all the writers in my writing groups… powerful editors all.

And finally Emer Cleary who has given Summer Triangle the kiss of life and who has stopped me from waltzing gaily out of the house in my underwear…

“Writing without revising is the literary equivalent of waltzing gaily out of the house in your underwear. Patricia Fuller

http://www.emuink.ie/

http://tarasparlingwrites.wordpress.com/2013/08/15/5-reasons-why-self-published-authors-should-be-whipped-for-not-using-editors/

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4 thoughts on “WALTZING GAILY OUT OF THE HOUSE IN YOUR UNDERWEAR…

  1. So what happened to the 55,000 words you had to axe? It’s said that nothing is wasted when you’re writing so maybe those words will find their way into your next book?

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